Archives

All posts for the month March, 2008

Last month I had a look at what plastic kits are available of the A10 Violet, Stanza and Auster series. Unfortunately, there was not a lot of variety to be had but with models of the Nissan Silvia and Gazelle series, this is not the case. Whilst there are plenty of re-issues of older kits, there are still quite a number of different kits available from a variety of manufacturers. Here I’m only going to cover the first three generations of Silvia, the CSP311, S10 and S110. Needless to say this is not an exhaustive list as there are no doubt more rare and obscure kits out there but below you can check out the most commonly found ones.

First up is the original Fairlady Roadster based Nissan Silvia from 1965, the CSP311 model. There are, not surprisingly, very few kits of this car with the only readily available kit coming from Imai in 1/24 scale. This is motorised, as are most Japanese kits but regardless, it is quite a nice model and features a full interior. I have built the earlier release of the Imai kit and with care it makes a very nice model. The only other CSP311 kit I have seen (above left) is from an unknown manufacturer and is again motorised but curiously features a metal chassis. Below are the early and late (current) releases of the Imai kit.

Continue Reading

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

Okay… for the lazy and ill equipped. Not all of us have a blast cabinet so often the only way to remove rust from items such as suspension components is to do it labouriously by hand with abrasives and a wire brush. If like me you can think of plenty of other ways you’d rather occupy your time them this technique might be for you. All that’s required is a quantity of brick cleaner and a big plastic container. Before I go any further, I should point out that you’ll be dealing with a particularly unpleasant chemical which is a diluted acid and thus quite corrosive. It can cause burns and is most likely quite toxic if consumed. There is also the potential for harmful fumes so work in a well ventilated space and use gloves! It may also be wise to use eye protection as I dread to think how nasty it would be getting this stuff in your eye!

Continue Reading

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

This certainly is a real treat for my Sunny truck. I was going with the GX twin SU’s on the original A14 but that plan has now changed somewhat. Yesterday I picked up not only an old Janspeed header but also a set of Mikuni carbs! The Mikunis are mounted on a GX intake meaning that although it is for an oval port head, it has the wrong bolt pattern to suit the A14. So, I’ll either have to re-drill the head or pick up a replacement intake. I think I’ll go with the latter as it will make possible future cylinder head swaps easier. Of course it’ll be no use adding these parts without taking things a little further so I’ll be adding a performance cam and uprated valve springs as well as doing a little head work to smooth out the ports. The bottom end will remain stock for now.

I’ve yet to strip the Mikunis to see what jets are fitted. Externally they look to be in excellent shape, so I’ve no reason to suspect there will be any hidden surprises. I would expect the carbs to have been on an A12 previously (possibly a 1293cc) so they may need a little reworking for the A14, although the chokes fitted look to be pretty big. The Janspeed header needs some minor alteration to clear the floor-pan but it shouldn’t take much. It’s a 4-2-1 design so should be nice for street use. Pics and progress as it happens!

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

Datsun Sado

If you reside outside of Portugal, the chances are you will never have seen a Datsun Sado in the flesh. Indeed, the majority of Datsun enthusiasts have most likely never even heard of this curious little truck, which is hardly surprising due to it’s limited marketing and relatively low production. Portugal wasn’t the only country to get these trucks as they were also exported from Portugal to a small number of African nations too. Thailand also got their own version a few months earlier than Portugal which was assembled by Siam Motors and badged as the Datsun 1200AX.

Continue Reading

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

The pillar-less hardtop is one of the most popular body styles amongst fans of old Japanese cars, and for good reason. Most combine stylish lines inspired by 60’s and 70’s Detroit muscle with finely engineered and sometimes quite sophisticated running gear. Many are of interest simply because they were never marketed outside of Japan and those that were often had lower specifications and there was less choice of trim levels. Most Japanese manufacturers have produced a hardtop at some point from the diminutive Daihatsu Max to the full sized Toyota Crown, and Nissan are no exception. For more than twenty years preceding the demise of the Datsun brand name, Nissan produced both two and four door hardtops of many of their models.

Continue Reading

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

 

Back in January this year, the last Nissan 1400 Bakkie rolled off the production line at Rosslyn, South Africa and so ended one of the longest production runs for any Nissan. The little pickup, based on the B110 model Datsun Sunny (Datsun 1200) was originally launched way back in 1971 as the model B120 and later became the B122. The original specification was very similar to the Datsun Sunny, with the same 1171cc A series engine and four speed and the same basic suspension layout but in a neat little monocoque pickup body. A long wheelbase version was added to the range (GB122) and late changes such as a larger A14 engine and a 5 speed were introduced. In South Africa the trucks were on sale right from the start but local content laws meant that gradually a larger and larger percentage of each vehicle had to be locally manufactured. Initially known as the Datsun 1200 Bakkie the pickup outlived it’s saloon, wagon and coupe brethren whose production ceased in 1974.

Continue Reading

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

At over £180 (¥38,000) this KPGC10 Skyline GT-R miniature is definitely going to be one for the connoisseur with deep pockets, but those lucky enough to acquire one of these will not only be getting a very limited edition miniature but also something extremely high tech. Why? Well, unlike most metal miniatures with are usually die cast, the craftsmen at Iriso in Japan actually machine this one from a solid block of aluminium using sophisticated CNC machinery! The miniature is quite small, maybe a little smaller than a Matchbox car but the detail is incredible, right down to the badges. And even more amazing is that parts like the fender mirrors and rear wing are also hewn from the same chunk or aluminium as the rest of the body!

Continue Reading

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest