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All posts for the year 2003

You will definitely need a keen eye to build one of these unusual kits from Arii as not only are they in diminutive 1/32 scale, they are also quite remarkably detailed. The series of 64 kits are predominantly Japanese cars, although a handful of Europeans are in the mix. Sadly, few of the kits have chrome parts (the exception being the VW Beetle) so you will have to employ some bare metal foil or Alclad chrome paint. They do come with clear parts and rubber tyres, although occasionally the tyres are not quite right, often being to skinny to suit the more modern cars, but none of these problem are insurmountable. The quality of the moulding is first rate, as you would expect from a Japanese manufacturer, with little to no excess flashing and very crisp detail. Most kits even have reasonably detailed undersides, although none have opening doors, bonnets or bootlids, no that you’d expect features of that nature on a 1/32 scale kit. All in all I can highly recommend them, and if you’re into 1/32 slot car racing, these are just the ticket for building a unique race car. A full list of the models in the series with pictures after the jump…

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Once you have installed a bigger engine in your Datsun, a whole new set of problems come to light. One is the brakes …Datsun’s are not blessed with particularly great stoppers. Another is the differential. Too much abuse and that little R160 will go pop! The R160 Diff is fitted to the 510 and 610 sedans as well as 610 and 710 SSS coupes. This diff is a little weak in stock open form. By open I mean, non-limited slip. The weak link is the small side gears and pinions with the carrier itself. Launch to hard a few times and the teeth will strip from these gears in a moment. The best solution would be to fit a limited slip differential in it’s place. As the LSD had a clutch pack taking the load rather than the gears in question, it is substantially stronger, however, the R160 LSD is not particularly easy to come by, especially in the UK.

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Here’s another attempt by Nissan USA to confuse everyone. The previous model was called the Datsun 810… logically as it’s chassis code was also 810. The model 810 was replaced by the model 910 but did they call that one a Datsun 910? No, of course not. They named it 810 Maxima. So, the 810 became an 810 Maxima and eventually just plain old Maxima. Everywhere else it’s a Datsun Bluebird…

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A front spoiler is not only there for looks. It can aid stability and improve cooling, especially at high speed. It is possible to get front spoilers of various kinds to fit models such as 510, 610, 710 and B110. These usually have to be sourced front the USA or Australia. I bought this particular one for my 1971 Datsun 510 off of eBay from the States. Fitting it is fairly easy and below I give a step-by-step of how to install it. Of course not all spoilers will be the same built this type of spoiler, often called a “spook” is pretty popular so these instructions should be relevant to the majority of installations.
The first thing to do is to attach the spoiler and check for fit. It’s relatively easy to clamp the spoiler to the front valance with a couple of pairs of vise grips. Now is the time to do any trimming if neccesary on order to get a good fit.

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